FM Responds to Needs of Industry, Needs of Students

May 9, 2013 — Diana Putnam & Amy Radik

Curriculum at FM is evolving to keep pace with changing student needs and interests, emerging in-demand fields and occupations, and the employment trends of our local and regional economy.  An integral part of the curriculum design and development process is the regular input gathered from program advisory councils and the DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process.  The DACUM process brings together subject matter specialists from industry to work with a trained facilitator to identify and analyze key occupational characteristics and trends that program faculty use as part of new program development or curricula revision.

Recent DACUMs and advisory meetings have identified advancements and trends in healthcare and associated medical practices that are creating expanded career entry opportunities.  Other DACUM processes have pointed to technology innovations that require increasing levels of support in the interconnected global workplace.  In addition, emerging media trends prompted program development and redesign to address the growing use of interactive media technology and the need for students to create, design, and communicate using multiple media devices and software across multiple platforms including print, film, web, television, and radio. 

What does all of this mean?  It means that at FM, we recognize these rapid changes in technology and we respond to them.  After all, it is in our Mission to provide responsive programs.   With that, FM will be offering four new programs this fall.  They include: Communications and Broadcast Media A.S., Computer Networking A.A.S., Digital Communications and Transmedia A.A.S., and Health Sciences A.S.

The Health Sciences A.S. program will prepare graduates to continue their studies in fields such as Chiropractic, Clinical Laboratory Technologist, Dentistry, Forensics, Health Counseling, Medical Imaging, Medicine, Nutrition, Optometry, Pharmacy, Podiatry, Veterinary Medicine, and many others.  The program is a multidisciplinary approach that is well-rounded in the area of the natural sciences, social sciences, communication, and health. 

The Computer Networking A.A.S. program will emphasize practical problem-solving skills, the use of computers, networking technology, and written and oral communication skills to achieve a versatile computer networking background.  Upon graduating from this program, students will have the ability to adapt to the ever-changing IT industry.

The Digital Communication and Transmedia A.A.S. program is designed for students with a variety of career goals including graphic design, digital publishing, web design and animation, television, film, and interactive media.  Students will learn to communicate across a range of media platforms, from traditional graphic communication and design concepts to digital workflows and software tools for social media audiences.

Communications is a way to convey information across a multiplicity of mixed media as part of a transmedia process.  The Communications and Broadcast Media A.S. program will help students understand the history, economics, social impact, and employment opportunities of the mass media and teach them how to use digital media concepts to communicate effectively. 

“As technology continues to grow and change, so do the needs of our students and our employers,” says FM President Dr. Dustin Swanger.  “Adding these four new programs is just a starting point to meeting such needs.  By continually revamping programs through the DACUM process, adding new programs, and updating our already state-of-the-art labs, we aim to help more students graduate into the working world with a competitive edge.” 

To learn more about these new degree programs, contact the Admissions Office at (518) 736-FMCC (3622), ext. 8301. 

Diana Putnam is Dean of Business, Technology and Health Professions and Amy Radik is Coordinator of PR & Marketing.

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